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Lauren Baratz-Logsted-The One Question Tour

In promotion for her newest book, The Education of Bet, Lauren Baratz-Logsted is answering one question a day on various blogs around the blogosphere. Today is my day to host Lauren and here's my question:

If you had to travel back in time and spend time with Will and Bet, what modern convenience would you take with you that you couldn't live without?

Lauren: My little TV. I'd introduce Will and Bet to General Hospital. Once they realized that the people inside the box can't get out of the box, I'm sure they'd agree with me that the trial of Sonny for killing his wife - with no less than three people who know him on the jury! - is the most ridiculous thing they've ever seen. Will and Bet are wise that way.

Love it! I was hooked on GH in college and when Lauren talks about it on Twitter, it makes me want to go back and get hooked all over again. I love Sonny-that trial sounds crazy!

Want to follow Lauren's One Question Tour? Check out some of her other stops:

July 6: Elizabeth McCullough: When you write a novel with a historical setting, how much research do you do, when do you do the bulk of your research, what are your favorite sources and research aids, and how do you organize the information?
http://cvillewords.com/

July 8: Nicole Where did the inspiration for this novel come from, and did you encounter any difficulty when trying to create Bet as a believable boy?
http://www.leilajay.com/blog

About the Book (from Goodreads):
Bet is sixteen, very intelligent, but only knows as much as her limited education will allow. In Victorian England, girls aren't allowed to go to school.
Will is also 16, and though not related by blood, he and Bet act like brother and sister. In fact, they even look like brother and sister. And though they're both raised under the same roof, by the same kind uncle, Will has one big advantage over Bet: He's a boy, and being a boy means he isn't stuck in the grand house they call home. He gets to go out into the world--to school.
But that's not what Will wishes. He wants to join the military and learn about real life, not what's written in books.
So one night, Bet comes up with a plan. She'll go to school as Will. Will can join the military. And though it seems impossible, they actually manage to pull it off.
But once Bet gets to the school, she begins to realize the education she's going to get isn't exactly the one she was expecting.

Comments

  1. I'm a long time GH watcher! LOL

    It's definitely a much further step from reality now than it's ever been. I'll tell you that much.

    ReplyDelete

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